A Sample Thank You

The things we take for granted daily could make up an endless list. We must be aware that we are not here by accidents. We are all connected also in one way or another. We owe each other respect and gratitude.

No one owes anyone anything. You are accountable for your own life. For anyone to take a minute out of their time to do something nice or make a difference in your life. Whether briefly or detailed. They are owed a simple ‘thank you’ .

I myself overlook it sometimes. I often ask people for things without thinking to say please or thank you. A lot of time I will only remember after it was most appropriate to do so. To my dear readers- thank you for taking the time to click and read my post. Thank you for sharing my view and continue to encourage me to keep writing. Thanks.

care, Education, Elderly, Geriatric, Nurse, Nursing Home, Wisdom

Communicating With An Elderly Parent

With all due respect…

Although not necessary to include in the beginning of each sentence, it is important to keep in mind. Anyone older then you deserve respect, honesty, truth, and fairness. When communicating with your parent whether some senses have become impaired, a barrier has been identified such as increase confusion, or they are living long distance. Keep an open door policy just as they did with you when you were growing up. Now that you are responsible for many aspects of their lives they still want to be heard and psychological needs still needing to be met.

Be patient… Don’t rush them. A lot of elders become hearing impaired or have specific speech impairments that affects the way they communicate. Its not by their choice.

Be attentive… Don’t dismiss what they are saying. Even if you think they might be bending the true, still listen. It makes them feel like someone actually care about them. If you can sympathize show empathy.

Be respectful… Honor their wishes to the best of your abilities. It will bring fourth satisfaction later.

Be fair… You may not have all hours of a day to spend with your elderly mother or father but one phone call would add such a warm smile on his/her face. Take a few minutes to take a walk with him/her outside. A lot of disabled adults spend hours inside their home or facility sometimes they yearn for a chance to see and feel some sunlight. I once had a patient who said to me “these walls just do something you my brain”. It broke my heart.

Think about the changes you could began to see if you just change one those those things listed above.

Make a difference. Make a small change today. It will have bigger rewards later.

care, Education, Elderly, Geriatric, Goals, Journal, Life, Nurse, Nursing Home, Old, Self, Triage, Uncategorized, Wisdom, Women

Elderly Parent’s Test Results

A friend of mind said “my dad had a lot of tests done and he came home with the results unsure of what to do with them or how to read them. How many people go through that with their parents?”

My answer is A LOT.

A routine doctor’s visit for an elderly patient is different then a usual physical or office visit. Many are on multiple medications which require regular testing and blood work. An adult child taking care of or who is responsible for an elderly parent does not have to be consumed with all the results of the test but should grasp an understanding of what tests are needing to be done, why and how often. Keeping a schedule of medications, appointments, procedures, lab work, and diagnostics is very important. Organization is key.

Also having an open communication method with the Physician or Prescriber is just as important. Your parent might have received a copy of the test results but did they understand the findings of the test? What changes are going to happen according to those results?

It could be a slight adjustment of one medication or the complete discontinuation of another medication. Because the elderly often have complicated health problems the Prescriber could have them taking many medications and sometimes they can interact. Communicating with your Prescriber at a timely manner is key. It’s a lot of number to keep up with if you are trying to become an expert at keeping up with test results.

Here are some common testings that the elderly usually have to get done sometime along the way and the normal and abnormal values…


If it becomes a task which you struggle to maintain, seek help from another professional such as a Home Health Care Agency in your community or a Case Manager. They can be the in between person and accepting their services could be already covered by your insurance provider and eliminate the headache of having to sort through all the paper work.

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care, Education, Elderly, Geriatric, Goals, Hurricane, Journal, Life, Love, Men, Nurse, Nursing Home, Old, Self, Triage, Uncategorized, Wisdom, Women

Eldercare: Hurricane Season

I just thought to share in this post that with the ongoing hurricane season and brewing hurricanes in the Atlantic Ocean, there are family members out there that are worried sick about their love ones. There are ways to prepare for this. Take a look at the items listed below to help you pack accordingly.

To those that are worried about family members in the Nursing Homes, Hospitals, and Rehabs… Rest assured that many of those places are also used as shelters because of safety guidelines they have had to upheld. They also have more resources to help those in need. A lot of staff will be required to stay and work until the storm has cleared. Rest assured that if things get out of hand, emergency personnel will rescue those in need through triage. If you take care of a love one at home call a nursing home in your area that may accept Respite Patients. They will keep your family member and care for them for a few days at a time and bill the insurance company. It will give you peace of mind. If you are not sure that this is the right choice for you, send me in email and I will be able to help you find resources in your area or connect you to a Case Manager that can help.

My advice is to take care of those at your home first, be sure to find a safe shelter before the storm if your home may be in danger. Allow trained medical staff to care for your loved one to the best of their abilities.

Here’s a list of things you need to have on hand to prepare for the hurricane season:

Remember to print hard copy of any documents you need – instructions, tips or anything in case you have no power.


  • Water – at least 1 gallon daily per person for 7 to 10 days. Don’t forget some for your pets.
  • Food – at least enough for 3 to 7 days
    — non-perishable packaged or canned food / juices
    — foods for infants or the elderly
    — snack foods (Peanut butter; mixed PBJ; breakfast bars; crackers; canned fruit; raisins; chips;
    — non-electric can opener
    — cooking tools / fuel
    — paper plates / plastic utensils / paper cups — trash bags and duct tape – useful for clean-up, or patching leaks in an emergency
  • Blankets / Pillows, etc.
  • Clothing – seasonal / rain gear/ sturdy shoes
  • First Aid Kit / Medicines / Prescription Drugs
  • Special Items – for babies and the elderly (Briefs, diapers, Wipes)
  • Toiletries / Hygiene items / Moisture wipes
  • Bug spray, Cortisone for bug bites
  • Sunscreen & Lotion
  • Tarp to cover holes if needed.
  • Bleach
  • Water purification tablets
  • Waterless soap saves water for drinking
  • Flashlight / Batteries
  • Radio – Battery operated
  • Battery operated television, with extra batteries.
  • Extra battery adapter for your phone
  • Cash – Banks and ATMs may not be open or available for extended periods. Make sure you have small bills because it will often be difficult to get change, I you only have a $100 and water is $10 for a case and you are limited to one case, you do not want to have the choice of paying $100 or having no water.
  • Keys to house, cars, boats etc
  • Toys, Books and Games
  • Important documents – in a waterproof container or watertight resealable plastic bag
    — insurance, medical records, bank account numbers, Social Security card, etc. Don’t forget your re-entry documents (e.g. stickers or passes). Many barrier islands require some documentation in order to return. Keep important phone number here. You may know them, but a loved one may not.
  • Tools – keep a set with you during the storm. A pocket knife, nails, a hammer and rope are important elements. Towels and buckets are useful too if you develop a leak.
  • Vehicle fuel tanks filled
  • Pet care items
    — proper identification / immunization records / medications
    — ample supply of food and water
    — a carrier or cage
    — muzzle and leash


If you think of anything else to add to the list, please add it in the comment box. Do Share this with your friends and family to create awareness. You could save a life!


Education, Elderly, Geriatric, Journal, Life, Nurse, Old, Self, Uncategorized, Women

Children of The Elderly

They’ve raised us.

They grow old.

Now what?

It’s a question we all will ask ourselves one day. Whether you grew up an only child or the middle child. Unless God takes them early, you will have to someday take responsibility for your aging parents. With long term illnesses like Alzheimer’s, Dementia, COPD, Etc; the responsibilities increase. The question remains: are you legally responsible for your parent when he/she gets old? (Leave your answers on the comment box).

My thoughts on that is that you are. You owe your parent the same commitment they gave while raising you. Whether you had an abusive parent, one that spoiled you rotten, or sometimes absent. They did what they knew to do. They projected unto you what had influenced them as you might do to your own child. Learn the art of forgiveness and help create meaning to your aging parent’s life.

Now you might ask, well, how much of a responsibility you’re talking about? The details are almost irrelevant. If your parents planned their elder years financially and ahead of time, for you moving forward will be easier to handle. If they created a living will or another legal documents regarding the delegation of their care, again, you’re lucky. If not, just do your best to keep a smile on their faces everyday till the very end. It will be hard to deal with but don’t worry as you navigate through it things will get easier Keep reading this blog for more tips and encouragements weekly. You will learn many lessons that you did not know you still had to learn in life. You will learn the different stages of grieving as you see the changes begin to happen. Don’t get discourage. Just try your best daily.

Back to how much of a responsibility you have towards your aging parents… Here’s a vey basic list.

  • Empathy
  • Regular visits
  • Communicate with other family members/siblings
  • Comfort
  • Quality of life
  • Affordable care (in many states the children are financially responsible)

This post is not intended to persuade you to forget about yourself and take care of your aging parents solely. No. You also as an individual have needs and should be very realistic about them. Share with your siblings the responsibilities and communicate openly with them. If you’re in it alone, hire a care giver / sitter, part-time or full-time. That can help you to create more time to relax and rebuild. There are Adult Day Cares and Home Care Service companies out in the community where you stay that can help you out. Be sure to keep in mind that you are still important and valuable.

Education, Elderly, Geriatric, Goals, Journal, Life, Love, Men, Nurse, Old, Self, Uncategorized, Wisdom, Women

Geriatric Nurse

Prior to becoming a Nurse, I wanted to be a Pharmacist. I did not have a guide or even an older sibling to warn me about the experiences ahead. I just figured things will just fall in place by the Grace of God. Oh did they!?! I began to struggle financially which put me in a position to get a job as a CNA. Though I really did not have a desire to work as a CNA , I went to a Technical High school, it was one of the many skills I acquired.

My first job was with an Agency. . .

I would drive to a clients home and did things from cooking small meals, go for a walk, take them grocery shopping, etc. I learned what it means to be humble. The money was not big but it was more then I had before. I still struggled because the hours were not always guaranteed.

I applied for a job at a Nursing Home. . .

I had enough experience with clients by then to feel comfortable doing patient care. I mastered the art of selflessness. I begin to put people’s needs first before mines. I was no longer the same selfish person. I started enjoying what I was doing. When a patient says thank you, it made me want to do more. Of course there have been countless number of patients that were rude and said mean things, but they were also Alzheimer and Dementia patients. I learned to let things go quicker. (Look out for the post when I tell you how a patient bit me on my breast.) Coming Soon….

I found Private Duty jobs. . .

The real adventures begun when I met private cases. I learned so much life lessons from them. From the guy that told me that selling my paid-off Mitsubishi Galant to finance an old Jeep Liberty was the stupidest thing I could have ever done (He was right), to the Super rich guy dying but called the flower shop everyday to deliver roses to his wife. (Super Romantic). I have been blessed by so many precious memories that I could not see myself doing anything else after that.

I went to school and became a Nurse. . .

Best decision of my life! I get to deliver so much more to my patients and make a greater impact. I get to help family members navigate through their parent’s care. I am there for them and with them and I would not want to be anywhere else.

I chose to continue my education. . .

To help the Geriatric population not only because they have had such a great impact in my life because they deserve the best care after giving off so many years to this world. We are a product of their hard work. We are here because they worked hard and gave us something to live for. They hold the key to a lot of success stories, romantic adventures, funny moments, mistakes to learn from, and wisdom. Why not encourage them to let you in on their secrets. Be a blessing to them.

That’s Why I Chose To Be A Nurse.



Stay Positive…

The title of this post is simply my daily reminder. Because…

The past few months, I’ve been feeling so defeated. Instead of climbing out of the hole I seem to be sinking deeper into it. The hole of Depression that is. It took over all aspects of my life. I was in a very dark place. In my culture, parents in particular thinks that Depression is a Taboo. I don’t think they even recognize it as a mental illness. Since it’s so hard to explain to my family, it became harder to deal with on my own. 16684163_1825465197717843_2125581928065997267_n

It’s hard to be laughing or smiling, having a good time when it seems like nothing’s going right. It may seem like the entire world is against you.

My message to you, my dear readers… Persevere.

Stay Positive.

As I write this post to share my struggles, it is not to convey that I am healed and if I can do it everyone can. No. Not at all. I actually have not defeated depression. It’s a daily struggle. It’s a hard battle to fight alone and even harder to explain with words. Instead, take this as a reminder to start creating new patterns. Be more positive, optimistic even. Have faith that things can and will get better. Today might be hard but tomorrow I will get myself up off the couch and make it to the bedroom. Start with a new hobby. Like myself, I just became a workaholic instead. Every time I feel like I’m spiraling back to being in that state of mind, I sign up for double shifts at the nursing home or call my second job and tell them I’m available. I tire myself on purpose so that I don’t ball up in a corner and create a pity party in my head.

Most important of all, stay positive. There is light at the end of the tunnel. The light gets brighter as you get closer (As You Bring More Positive Thoughts and Actions).


Share your story in the comment section. We can support each other 🙂

Goals, Journal, Life, Love, Men, Self, Uncategorized, Women

Know Thy Self…

Have you come to the point where you’re asking in your head; what is happening to me, what am I doing with my life, where am I going? Don’t feel like you are alone. We all at some point asked ourselves those same questions.


I won’t lie to you. Life is not easy, unless as the saying goes, you were born with a silver spoon in your mouth. Even then, as we get older we are prone to make mistakes, wonder, have needs to be met, and a desire for self worth.

The title of today’s blog is “know thy self”, I picked that title because in my opinion when we come to start asking such questions if we know ourselves by definition, we can easily answer those questions. Here’s a quick exersize you can do right now before you finish reading this post to help you evaluate your life.

  1. What would a perfect day look like?
  2. Are you a morning / night person?
  3. What’s more satisfying to you: time / money?
  4. Do you like to be in the spotlight?
  5. Is your life “on hold” in any aspect? 
  6. What would you do if you had more energy?
  7. Do you get frustrated easily?
  8. How much TV do you watch in a week?
  9. What accomplishment that would make the biggest difference to your happiness?

Have you tried writing in a journal? Even if you don’t write in it everyday, give it a try. go to Target or Walmart and but a nice little book and begin your journey today. Answer the above questions in your new book and think about your answers. Are they satisfying? do you have some more soul searching to do? Keep records in your book.

Perhaps you’re reading this and have come up with more question to add to the list. Let me know on the comments below. What are some self motivating things you do daily to help you stay focus and in tuned with your inner self?